The Fogo Process

Fogo Island has a long history with film. Fogo Island was the location of a now legendary community filmmaking project in the late 1960s known worldwide as The Fogo Process. The National Film Board of Canada (NFB) and Memorial University of Newfoundland Extension Service came to the island to give light and voice to communities struggling with the loss of the inshore fishery that has sustained them for centuries and the accompanying threat of resettlement.

Filmmaker Colin Low and community worker Fred Earle worked from the vision of Donald Snowden who headed up the Extension Service. Colin Low made 27 films on Fogo Island that sparked a dialogue. This in turn catalyzed much positive social change by helping islanders gain the knowledge and confidence to find a path to preserving their communities.

Shorefast believes that film continues to have a key role to play in the telling of our stories and to the preservation of culture and positive social change. Shorefast and the NFB announced their partnership in the Fogo Island Film House, introduced media literacy workshops to the island’s youth, and in 2010 announced their partnership to establish a film residency program for visiting filmmakers.

Introduction to Fogo Island

Introduction to Fogo Island

The Children of Fogo Island

The Children of Fogo Island

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